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Risk of infections

Healthcare burden

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Video

Risk of infections

Healthcare burden

White Paper download

CONTACT US

UNSAFE PRACTICES

Accidental needle-stick injuries

Risk of infections

Re-use of the
same syringe

The WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION has developed policy recommendations to support and inform the worldwide community about the importance of introducing safety-engineered syringes

THE RISK OF NEEDLE-STICK INJURIES

Needlestick injuries are among the greatest risks in clinical practice worldwide. Of the 16 billion injections administered every year, an alarming 23 million result in infections.

That’s more than twice the population of Paris, or London, or New York.

Every single year.

For healthcare workers, this is especially hazardous, carrying the risk of cross-contamination from patients infected with HIV, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. And as the global demand for injection-based treatment grows, this risk of injury can only increase.

It’s a crisis already recognized by both the US and the EU (which enacted the Health and Safety (Sharps Instruments in Healthcare) Regulations in 2013).

However, the good news is that most or all of these injuries are preventable.

In fact, since the majority of needlestick injuries are caused by poor syringe design, if hospitals were to switch to safety injection devices (SIDs) it could cut the risk of sharps injuries by 60-80%. These patient-centric designs would also reduce costs, improve the patient experience and increase take-up, by making it safe and simple enough for patients to treat themselves.

Protecting healthcare workers
from needlestick infections

It’s not just safe
It’s SafeR®

Protecting healthcare workers
from needlestick infections

It’s not just safe
It’s SafeR®

THE BURDEN NSIs PLACE ON HEALTHCARE

The duty to keep patients and healthcare workers safe is only half the story. According to a recent study*, NSI-related infections in patients and healthcare workers cost UK healthcare organizations an estimated £300 million a year in the UK.

These costs – along with the hazards – are set to escalate in line with the explosion in demand.

The growing burden of chronic diseases like diabetes, cancer, hormonal diseases etc – along with the increasing need for self-care devices – is now driving growth in the Safety and Prefillable Syringe market. The international journal, Clinical Practice and Diabetes Research stated in 2019 that the global prevalence of diabetes had reached 9.3% (463 million people), a figure they say is likely to keep growing to 25% in 2030 and to reach an alarming 51% by 2045.

That’s one in two people living with diabetes.

Which means the safety of self-injection by the patient will be absolutely paramount.

As for the safety of healthcare workers, the US OSHA Standard 1910.1030 has already stated that employees must have a say in what devices are used, and that instruments must be chosen for appropriateness and effectiveness in preventing infection. Failure to take this into account could come back to bite organisations in the future.

*Reference: Saia et al (2010)

The duty to keep patients and healthcare workers safe is only half the story. According to a recent study*, NSI-related infections in patients and healthcare workers cost UK healthcare organizations an estimated £300 million a year in the UK.

These costs – along with the hazards – are set to escalate in line with the explosion in demand.

The growing burden of chronic diseases like diabetes, cancer, hormonal diseases etc – along with the increasing need for self-care devices – is now driving growth in the Safety and Prefillable Syringe market. The international journal, Clinical Practice and Diabetes Research stated in 2019 that the global prevalence of diabetes had reached 9.3% (463 million people), a figure they say is likely to keep growing to 25% in 2030 and to reach an alarming 51% by 2045.

That’s one in two people living with diabetes.

Which means the safety of self-injection by the patient will be absolutely paramount.

As for the safety of healthcare workers, the US OSHA Standard 1910.1030 has already stated that employees must have a say in what devices are used, and that instruments must be chosen for appropriateness and effectiveness in preventing infection. Failure to take this into account could come back to bite organisations in the future.

*Reference: Saia et al (2010)

Yearly Cost impact

$530.000.000
$530.000.000

*References: Devices, ATATAM. (2016). WHO guideline on the use of safety-engineered syringes…
https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789241549820; and National Library of Medicine

DRIVE FOR INNOVATION TO PROVIDE SAFETY

Retractable syringes significantly reduce bloodstream infections caused by needle-stick injuries

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